salt-glaze

Tea and cookies

Wood-fired salt-glazed plate with home-baked biscuits

Of an early and busy weekday morning, I relish strong tea in volume, and what better to accompany it than a home-made biscuit. These in the pic are served on one of my side plates, and made from a recipe in Fearnley-Whittingstall's 'Everyday' pg.393, "Ten-minute cookies", delicious!...

Serving

pasta plate, side-handled. Wood-fired salt-glaze

Flat open shapes provide an inviting canvas for slip and glaze, colour and surface experimentation. Making and decorating plates is splendid occupation. Mine come in several shapes and sizes, from side plates and dinner plates up to large servers. Much of this group of work...

Drinking

Espresso cup, herringbone rouletter. Wood-fired salt-glaze

This group of objects celebrate the multifarious rituals of drinking, and includes mugs of many shapes and sizes, tea bowls, beakers and tankards. They are among the most important to me, and are perhaps the most intimate...

Baking

Oval baking dish with side handles

My love for food, that is making, sharing and eating it, directly inspires my clay work. Many of the pots that fall...

Salt-glaze

Salt-glazed pot, surface detail, orange peel

Salt-glaze is the dynamic process I use to decorate and glaze my pots. Common salt along with sodium carbonate (washing soda), is added during kiln firing to the fireboxes. The chamber at this point is white hot, approximately 1200ÂșC. The heat of the firebox forces the salts to vaporise into their gaseous elements. It is the sodium element which combines with the clay itself and any slips applied to it, to create a range of beautiful and serendipitous...